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Next: Downdating and the Up: Downdating of Szego Previous: Introduction

Downdating of Szego polynomials

  In this section we first establish the connection between Szego polynomials and unitary upper Hessenberg matrices. This connection makes it possible to downdate the coefficients , and when a node-weight pair is deleted from the inner product (1.1) by applying a QR algorithm for unitary upper Hessenberg matrices. Conversely, when a node-weight pair is added to the inner product the coefficients , and can be updated by applying an inverse QR algorithm for unitary upper Hessenberg matrices. The algorithmic details are discussed in the end of the section.

The connection between the Szego polynomials determined by (1.1) and a unitary Hessenberg matrix can be seen as follows. Using the basis of Szego polynomials, we can write

 

where for , and . Let for , and define the upper Hessenberg matrix . Also define the unitary matrix by

 

Substitution of , , into (2.1) yields the equation

 

or, equivalently,

 

where . Thus, H is a unitary upper Hessenberg matrix with positive subdiagonal elements that is uniquely determined by the inner product (1.1). Also note that the first n columns of U make up the matrix Q defined by (1.8). Algorithms for the solution of the least-squares problem (1.6) can therefore be viewed in terms of the spectral decomposition (2.4).

It is fairly straightforward to show, by using the recurrence relations (1.2)--(1.3), that H can be written as a product of m elementary unitary transformations that are defined by the recursion coefficients and for the . We have

 

where the , , are Givens matrices

and is the diagonal matrix

We refer to the representation (2.5) as the Schur parametric form of H.

The development of efficient algorithms for eigenproblems for unitary Hessenberg matrices is facilitated by the fact that every unitary upper Hessenberg matrix with nonnegative subdiagonal elements has a unique Schur parameterization. For example, when the implicitly shifted QR algorithm is applied to find the spectral decomposition of a unitary Hessenberg matrix, a sequence of intermediate unitary Hessenberg matrices is generated that converges to a diagonal matrix. In [5], the QR algorithm for unitary Hessenberg matrices is formulated in terms of the Schur parameters of the intermediate matrices. This results in an implementation that requires only arithmetic operations per iteration on a matrix of order m.

Assume for the moment that the matrix H and scaling factor are given, but that the abscissas and weights of the inner product (1.1) are not explicitly known. Then it follows from (2.4) and (2.2) that the nodes are the eigenvalues of H, while the normalized square-root of the weight is equal to the first component of the normalized eigenvector corresponding with . (We assume that each eigenvector is scaled to have unit Euclidean length and a nonnegative first component.) The unitary Hessenberg QR algorithm can be used to compute the matrix and vector , without computing the rest of U, with not more than arithmetic operations per iteration. Throughout this paper denotes the axis vector in . The QR algorithm determines one abscissa-weight pair at a time, and for each pair computed the order of the unitary upper Hessenberg matrix is reduced by one, so that the reduced Hessenberg matrix corresponds with the abscissa-weight pairs that have not yet been determined.

We remark that in the case that the nodes of the discrete inner product are real, then the analogue of the matrix H is a real symmetric tridiagonal matrix T with positive subdiagonal elements. This matrix T contains recurrence coefficients for orthonormal polynomials that satisfy a three-term recurrence relation. Golub and Welsch [4] proposed the use of the QR algorithm for symmetric tridiagonal matrices for the computation of the abscissa-weight pairs associated with T. This algorithm also determines one abscissa-weight pair at a time, and reduces the order of T when such a pair has been found.

Conversely, the construction of H from the inner product (1.1) can be regarded as an inverse eigenvalue problem. In particular, given the matrix and the vector , we can perform a sequence of elementary unitary similarity transformations whose composition results in an unitary matrix U such that the matrix on the right-hand of

 

is of upper Hessenberg form with positive subdiagonal elements. (The represents an arbitrary scalar that remains unchanged.) In other words, , and is a unitary upper Hessenberg matrix H. Consequently, H is the matrix corresponding with the inner product (1.1).

The transformation of to H can be performed using arithmetic operations with the inverse unitary QR (IUQR) algorithm described in [1]. The IUQR algorithm is an updating procedure because it incorporates node-weight pairs one at a time. After the stage of the algorithm has been executed, the unitary Hessenberg matrix corresponding with the inner product determined by the first j nodes and weights has been obtained.

In [10], the approximation problem (1.6) is solved using the IUQR algorithm to construct the Schur parameters of the unitary Hessenberg matrix H. The elementary unitary matrices are accumulated against the vector during the algorithm to obtain the vector of Fourier coefficients without explicitly forming U. In this way we obtain the interpolating polynomial that is the solution of (1.6) with n = m in arithmetic operations. Of course, the partial sums of the Fourier expansion of the interpolating polynomial yields the solution (1.10) of (1.6) for each n < m. Moreover, if one is interested in computing only for n < m, then the algorithm can be curtailed so that only arithmetic operations are required for the computation of the parameters , , and . See [10] for details.

We now turn to the algorithmic details of our downdating scheme. Assume that we have solved the least-squares problem (1.6) with n = m by the method described in [10], so that sets of Schur parameters and of complementary parameters corresponding with the inner product (1.1), as well as sets of Fourier coefficients of the interpolating polynomial are explicitly known. In the downdating problem, we seek to solve the corresponding least-squares problem with one term deleted from (1.1). In particular, let be the node that is to be deleted from the inner product (1.1). In order to simplify some formulas that follow, we assume without loss of generality that .

Introduce the inner product

 

and discrete norm

We seek the polynomial such that

Denote the family of orthonormal Szego polynomials with positive leading coefficient associated with (2.7) by . Also let and denote the sets of recurrence coefficients for the , and let and , where is the total weight of the measure that defines (2.7). Then from the above discussion, there is a unique unitary Hessenberg matrix and a unique unitary matrix such that

and

 

where denotes the axis vector in . Moreover, the recurrence coefficients and are the Schur parameters and complementary parameters, respectively, of . The optimal polynomial is then given by

where the vector of Fourier coefficients is given by and .

Our scheme for downdating is based on the observation that and can be computed from H and U by applying one step of the QR algorithm with ``ultimate'' shift , together with some permutation similarity transformations, to determine a unitary matrix W such that

 

where . Then

and

 

Thus, the downdated Fourier coefficients are obtained by accumulating each elementary unitary transformation against . An efficient implementation is obtained by using the QR algorithm for unitary Hessenberg matrices described in [5].

We now assume that for some l, , and let . One step of the QR algorithm with shift applied to the matrix H determines a unitary upper Hessenberg matrix such that

because is an eigenvalue of H. It is easy to see, however, that the QR algorithm applied to H will not yield the required , because the vector will not be transformed as required by (2.10). On the other hand, an RQ algorithm for H, in which the transforming matrix would be a product of Givens matrices in the reverse order of (2.12) below, would yield the desired similarity transformation.

Instead of modifying the unitary Hessenberg QR algorithm of [5] to perform an RQ iteration, we apply the QR algorithm to the unitary Hessenberg matrix , where is the reversal matrix of order m. It is easily seen that if H is given by (2.5), then

where for and . The application of the QR algorithm on is equivalent with that of the RQ algorithm on H. One iteration of the QR algorithm with shift applied to generates a unitary upper Hessenberg matrix

 

such that

 

Moreover, can be taken to be an arbitrary unimodular number because deflation has taken place [5]. Let denote the complementary parameter to for .

Observe that only the last two components of are nonzero, and that can be chosen so that these two components are given by

Finally, we transform the right-hand side of (2.13) by similarity using , where is the reversal matrix of order m-1, and transpose the result. In this way we transform H to , where . Moreover, , and by the uniqueness of the reduction, , , and . The vector of Fourier coefficients is then determined from (2.11) by applying to incrementally.

Observe that our downdating procedure requires knowledge of the node to be deleted but not of the corresponding weight. We can therefore compare the computed value of to the actual value in order to assess the accuracy of the computations. If is not close to , then the downdated polynomials and might not be accurate. Another accuracy check is provided by the computed value of in the algorithm. This quantity is the diagonal element of the upper triangular matrix in the QR factorization of , which is mathematically zero when is an eigenvalue of H. If the computed value of is not ``tiny'', then the computed downdated polynomial might be inaccurate. We therefore consider and as being part of the output of the algorithm.

 

The algorithm overwrites the Fourier coefficients with intermediate quantities. Algorithm 2.1 requires arithmetic operations and the evaluation of m-1 square roots.

We have already noted that if the nodes are real, then the analogue of the matrix H is a real symmetric tridiagonal matrix T with positive subdiagonal elements. Similarly with Algorithm 2.1, downdating of the orthonormal polynomials associated with T, as well as of Fourier coefficients, can be carried out by algorithms based on the QR algorithm for symmetric tridiagonal matrices. This observation may be new.

In certain data-fitting applications it may be desirable to update the polynomial , given by (1.9)--(1.10) with n=m, by replacing certain abscissa-weight pairs. This can be carried out by successively removing an abscissa-weight pair by Algorithm 2.1, and then adding a new abscissa-weight pair using one step of Algorithm 3.1 in [10]. This combination of algorithms yields a sliding window scheme.



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Next: Downdating and the Up: Downdating of Szego Previous: Introduction



Greg Ammar
Tue Feb 14 12:51:53 CST 1995